Home / About / Lectures / Catalogue / Education / Italian
Artists: Tamy Ben-Tor / Marnix de Nijs / Mark Formanek / Marzia Migliora / Julius Popp / Reynold Reynolds / Jens Risch / Michael Sailstorfer / Arcangelo Sassolino / Fiete Stolte

Exhibition view at Centro di Cultura Contemporanea Strozzina, Firenze
Photo: Valentina Muscedra


Exhibition view at Centro di Cultura Contemporanea Strozzina, Firenze
Photo: Valentina Muscedra


Exhibition view at Centro di Cultura Contemporanea Strozzina, Firenze
Photo: Valentina Muscedra


Exhibition view at Centro di Cultura Contemporanea Strozzina, Firenze
Photo: Valentina Muscedra


Exhibition view at Centro di Cultura Contemporanea Strozzina, Firenze
Photo: Valentina Muscedra


Marnix de Nijs
Photo: CCCS, Firenze; Valentina Muscedra


Accelerator, 2006
Exhibition view at Centro di Cultura Contemporanea Strozzina, Firenze
Photo: Valentina Muscedra

The theme of the work is the human being and his need to obey the diktat of time in order to survive: the images simulate the speed of the world which we live in and which forces man to increase his own speed for the sake of progress. De Nijs has chosen images of a big city without revealing which city this is or making its geographical location explicit, thus allowing viewers to identify it with their own surroundings. The work is clearly reminiscent of Paul Virilio's notion of spatial and temporal experience-his so-called dromology. Virilio has examined the effects upon individuals of the modern revolution in transport and digital communications from the point of view of speed: each step forward in the development of driving technology corresponds to an increase in speed and a decrease in temporal distances. So for instance, car drivers only perceive transient images out of focus, which fl ash before their eyes and disappear in an instant. The journey itself is done away with: all that matters is the destination. Even more radical are the effects caused by the use of audiovisual technology, which like "static vehicles" simultaneously present viewers with different image worlds. Users can potentially be omnipresent on screen while remaining physically motionless, thus removing all genuine spatial references. In his work, De Nijs plays with the contradiction deriving from the body/mind dichotomy: the physical experience of rotation finds correspondence in the image users must try to synchronize with the actual speed of the moving arm. The separation between body and space is the central feature of this installation, which challenges observers with its total dynamism. This dynamism, however, forces the viewers and players to remain motionless. The body and its natural reactions become increasingly less important compared to mental stimulation. Video technology allows users to be omnipresent while remaining in the same place, while the actual space withdraws and gives way to virtual reality.

Marnix de Nijs (The Netherlands, 1970)

A multimedia artist and sculptor, Marnix de Nijs explores the effects of technology on sensory and bodily perceptions through the construction of interactive devices which the public can directly engage with. The aim of his work is to establish a link between the sensory physicality of the public and the devices crafted by the artist, in such a way as to make people experience technological instruments as extensions of their own bodies-as artificial limbs to be used in intuitive ways. Accelerator is an installation consisting of a swivel chair mounted on a motorized structure. Users, who can control the direction and speed of the chair with a joystick, will be offered panoramic views of an anonymous metropolis by night. The public is invited to synchronize the moving images with the rotation of the chair, thus testing their own reaction skills. Once they have succeeded in this task, users will enjoy a clear view of the images and will no longer experience the sense of disorientation caused by the asynchronous rotation movement. The square target on the panoramic view above must be positioned on the exact spot shown by the enlarged image below. As soon as the two squares overlap, the images log in, rotating in tune with the user's movement. This leads to the next level, where a new panoramic view is shown rotating at greater speed. Six levels must be passed to complete the experience.


Accelerator, 2006
Interactive installation: mechanics, sensors, computer, projection
450 x 170 x 250 cm
Idea, hardware and images: Marnix de Njis; Image manipulation: Reinier van Brummelen;
Sound: Boris Debackere; Software: Brecht Debackere
Courtesy the artist



 
top
 
CCCS
Palazzo Strozzi