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Artists: Tamy Ben-Tor / Marnix de Nijs / Mark Formanek / Marzia Migliora / Julius Popp / Reynold Reynolds / Jens Risch / Michael Sailstorfer / Arcangelo Sassolino / Fiete Stolte

Exhibition view at Centro di Cultura Contemporanea Strozzina, Firenze
Photo: Valentina Muscedra


Exhibition view at Centro di Cultura Contemporanea Strozzina, Firenze
Photo: Valentina Muscedra


bit.fall, 2001-2006
Stainless steel, custom electronics, computer, custom software, water
Dimensions variable
Courtesy the artist



bit.fall, 2001-2006
Exhibition view at Centro di Cultura Contemporanea Strozzina, Firenze
Photo: Valentina Muscedra

The title bit.fall evokes the image of a natural waterfall, while also alluding to computer jargon (a bit being the binary digit used to measure computer information). Water is a crucial element which, according to the most recent scientific research, is capable of memorizing the various substances and frequencies it comes into contact with. Information about substances is impressed upon the molecular structure of water and then dissolved through its flux of energy and movement. The acoustic sphere also plays an important part in this work. The waterfall creates a background noise that seems to translate the uninterrupted babbling of the flux of information into music reminiscent-in an amplifi ed form-of the sound blood makes in pulsating through veins and arteries. Abstract data noise thus becomes a physical experience at the disposal of our senses. bit.fall constitutes a metaphor for the unstoppable data flood in contemporary society, which is marked by accelerated and continuous communication though constant updates. New keywords are ceaselessly visualized only to disappear in the growing tide of information that viewers are exposed to. Those wishing to keep up with technological society must engage with the rapid flood of data made available by the net and allow themselves to be carried away by the current of communication. Speed is the key to success for those aiming to affirm themselves in information society. There is no time to pause: he who hesitates is lost!

Julius Popp (Germany, 1973)

In his artistic pursuit, Julius Popp moves along the border between art and science. His ideas stem from collaboration with renowned research institutes such as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Fraunhofer Institut. Central points in his work are the mutual interactions of complex systems, work on language and the search for single concepts to be extrapolated from their original context. Popp's bit.fall installation is based on two closed cycles: a water cycle and an information cycle-a physical structure on the one hand, and a conceptual one on the other. From a devise consisting of a series of countless valves, small drops of water fall with extreme accuracy at short intervals. Like pixels on a computer screen, these drops form single legible words which are suspended in air for just an instant. They then return to being drops and are gathered in a basin that endlessly feeds the cycle. It is not the artist, however, who chooses what words are to be visualised. Through a direct connection to Google News, a real-time search algorithm finds the most relevant keywords, which are then transmitted to the cycle and formed for an instant by the falling drops. Paradoxically, each notion thus becomes both relevant and irrelevant, arousing amazement in the viewer for just an instant. For each word appears without any context and can only be viewed for a moment before the next word shows up, in a continuous process that has neither beginning nor end.



 
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