Strozzina
Gerhard Richter english
Lorenzo Banci
Marc Breslin
Antony Gormley
Roger Hiorns
Xie Nanxing
Scott Short
WolfgangTillmans
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Roger Hiorns
Exhibition view
© Centro di Cultura Contemporanea Strozzina, Firenze
Photo: Valentina Muscedra


Roger Hiorns
Untitled, 2008
Ceramic, compressor, foam
65 x 20 x 20 cm
Courtesy Corvi-Mora, London
© Roger Hiorns


Installation view, Corvi-Mora, London 2006
© Roger Hiorns  

The controlled use of randomness also plays an important role in Gerhard Richter’s work, as in the processes used for dissolving abstract fields of colour. For both of them, chance is a way of reducing the artist’s creative intervention and decision making regarding the composition to enable the works to form freely and, as Richter states, “answer completely for themselves”. For this reason both artists eschew a specific artistic style and do their utmost to keep their personality out of the work as far as possible. “I am very interested in the idea that the artwork would exist aesthetically without my hand, and in not  being present for most of the making” (Roger Hiorns).


Roger Hiorns
Exhibition view
© Centro di Cultura Contemporanea Strozzina, Firenze
Photo: Valentina Muscedra


Roger Hiorns
(United Kingdom, 1975)

Roger Hiorns applies the method of “programmed randomness” to his objects and installations. As a sculptor he mainly works with phenomena such as fire, the crystallization of liquid chemical elements (like copper sulphate) or the formation of foamy masses. He triggers reactions, partially entrusting the result of his work to organic behaviours that are not entirely predictable, hence eschewing the traditional controlled relationship between the sculptor and his material. For Hiorns it is crucial to transfer the creation of the artwork to the process that he himself has set in motion but over which he has no control. For the Untitled series of works the artist uses a basic solution which, thanks to a compressor, grows and develops, emerging from various containers in the form of a dense, soft, foamy mass. The shape of the containers is pre-established and fixed, and arouses associations that range from aspects of art history such as Brancusi’s Endless Column and the totem poles in African art, to everyday forms such as motors, mechanical elements and ordinary pots. The foam, by contrast, with its broad expressive potential ranging from soft and delicate to menacing and corrosive, generates ever new and fleeting forms that exist merely for an instant.

 
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