Artists
 

Marina Abramovic
Victor Alimpiev
Laura Belem
Candice Breitz
Rä di Martino
Nathalie Djurberg
Kota Ezawa
Harun Farocki
Charlotte Ginsborg
Philippe Grammaticopoulos
Cao Guimaràes
Frank Hesse
Alfredo Jaar
Jesper Just
Clare Langan
Zhenchen Liu
Domenico Mangano
Jenny Marketou
Bjoern Melhus
Almagul Menlibayeva
Sarah Morris
Guy Ben Ner
Julia Oschatz
Isabel Rocamora
Marinella Senatore
Eve Sussman +
The Rufus Corporation

Kenneth Tin-Kin Hung
Gillian Wearing
Arnold von Wedemeyer
Clemens von Wedemeyer +
Maya Schweizer

Suara Welitoff
Sislej Xhafa
Zimmerfrei

 

 
 
worlds on video - international video art
curated by Anita Beckers
19th September 2008 – 2nd November 2008
 
Home l Programme l Education l Information l Italian
 
   
Nationality Italy
Title NOT360
Year 2002
Length 8’00’’
Technical data Single Channel Film, Colour, sound, 16 mm transferred onto DVD
Sound Mauro Remiddi, Manolo Remiddi
Courtesy MONITOR video & contemporary art, Rome
 
 

Rä di Martino’s NOT360 is set on green hill in the countryside. It begins with an argument between two women, which is interrupted by an elderly gentleman on a bicycle. The camera moves slowly to the left, bringing a table with microphones and three more actors into view. One starts reciting lines from Shakespeare and another breaks into the song Que sera, sera. They are told to stop by the director, who is clearly under pressure and appears to have little understanding of the temperament of his actors. The scene is repeated from the top three times, with the director always calling “cut”. The last scene shows the band playing the background music but the filming is again interrupted, this time by the cell phone of the director, who definitively loses control of himself and the troupe. The filming comes to a halt. Nothing makes sense, neither the setting in the countryside nor the actors and their unexpected comments. Every attempt at filming falls through and it all ends up in chaos.

In NOT360 Rä di Martino makes a film within a film and peeps behind the scenes of a film set, a space normally off-limits to the spectator. The director makes three attempts to organize his troupe for filming but runs up against the stubborn refusal of his actors to stick to the script every time. The director himself constantly appears in the shots, getting in front of the camera and interrupting the scene. The music, another essential element of a film setting, also appears on camera. The very elements that must remain concealed in order to maintain the scenic illusion are thus shown to the public. The failure of the project is even implicit in the title of the film, NOT360: the camera never completes its movement of 360 degrees and the scene never arrives at its conclusion. Cinema, its history and its historical significance are some of the major themes addressed in various settings by Rä di Martino, who shows us its importance for our everyday perception of things and the collective memory of society.

Rä di Martino (Rome, 1975) has been awarded numerous prizes and taken part in group exhibitions at venues such as the Venice Biennial (Slovenian Pavilion), Manifesta (Trentino, Italy), the Tate Modern in London, the MACRO in Rome, the Busan Biennial (Korea), P.S. 1 and the MoMA in New York, the Deutsche Bank Collection in Milan and the Adriano Olivetti Foundation in Rome. He lives and works in New York.